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Monday, May 4, 2020 | History

3 edition of Monks, friars and nuns in sixteenth century Yorkshire found in the catalog.

Monks, friars and nuns in sixteenth century Yorkshire

Claire Cross

Monks, friars and nuns in sixteenth century Yorkshire

by Claire Cross

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Published by Yorkshire Archaeological Society in [York} .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Monks -- England -- Yorkshire -- History -- 16th century.,
  • Friars -- England -- Yorkshire -- History -- 16th century.,
  • Nuns -- England -- Yorkshire -- History -- 16th century.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. [xi]-xxi) and index.

    StatementClaire Cross and Noreen Vickers.
    SeriesRecord series (Yorkshire Archaeological Society) -- v.150, Record series (Yorkshire Archaeological Society) -- v. 150.
    ContributionsVickers, Noreen., Yorkshire Archaeological Society.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBX2594.Y6 C76 1995
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxi, 684 p. :
    Number of Pages684
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20895149M
    ISBN 10090212272X

    MONKS, Nuns, Friars middle class. These people usually gave up normal life amenities and devoted their lives to living religious locations such as convents to pray and study. They did not have responsibilities since they chose to live their lives this way and their role in society is usually to study, help poor families and sometimes serve as. Probably for the first centuries the nuns added other rules to the Benedictine one, especially that of Cesario di Arles. More precise information can be found in the eighth century, at the time of the evangelization of Germany: the nuns (Lioba, Valpurga) collaborated with the monks in the missions.

    Monks and nuns took vows of poverty (no money), chastity (no sex) and obedience (obeying the Abbot or Abbess). There were many different orders of monks, eg Benedictines, known as 'black monks.   Around 5, monks, 1, friars, and 2, nuns were pensioned off, while others who had depended on the monasteries for welfare simply joined the ranks of sturdy beggars. An act of had secured the estates of the dissolved houses for the Crown, and if the King had been less pressed for cash he might have kept more of their revenues for Author: Lindsay Clarke.

      Some of the thousands of monks and friars who were turned out of their monasteries in the s became priests or teachers or apothecaries. But nuns—roughly 1, of them at the time of the Dissolution--did not have such options. “Those who had relatives sought asylum in the bosom of their own family,” wrote Stowe with 19 th century. Early Cistercian monks in England were ofcourse pioneers from France, and they carried with them the French trend of naming new monasteries after their physicallocations-Rievaulx (in Yorkshire), and later on Beaulieu (in Hampshire) and Rewly (in Oxfordshire). Once .


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Monks, friars and nuns in sixteenth century Yorkshire by Claire Cross Download PDF EPUB FB2

Monks, Friars and Monks in Sixteenth Century Yorkshire (Yorkshire Archaeological Soc Record Series) by Claire Cross (Author)Authors: Noreen Vickers, Claire Cross. Buy Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth Century Yorkshire by Claire C.

Cross, Noreen Vickers from Waterstones today. Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £Pages: Books By Claire Cross All Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth Century Yorkshire (Yorkshire Archaeological Soc Record Series) Apr 1, by Claire Cross, Noreen Vickers Monks.

$ $ 70 Temporarily out of stock. Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth Century Yorkshire in Yorkshire Archaeological Society - Record Series (Huddersfield: Yorkshire Archaeological Society, ).

Buy Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth Century Yorkshire (Yorkshire Archaeological Soc Record Series) by Cross, Claire, Vickers, Noreen (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Claire Cross, Noreen Vickers. Monasticism and religious orders - England - History - 16th century.; Religious orders - History Monks, friars and nuns in sixteenth century Yorkshire / Claire Cross and Noreen Vickers - Details - Trove.

Details of occupants of Kirklees Priory at the time of the Dissolution of the monasteries. The priory was surrendered 24 November Taken from "Yorkshire Archaeological Society Record Series vol CI: Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth Century Yorkshire".

In the early 16th century Yorkshire contained 35 abbeys and priories, 19 friaries, two major monastic hospitals and 21 nunneries in addition to the double house of Watton.

By c, just before the Dissolution, these foundations accommodated well over a thousand monks, canons, friars and nuns, some of whose subsequent careers are detailed in this volume.

The Monastic Orders in Late Medieval Cambridge - Volume 11 - Barrie Dobson If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Cross, G and Vickers, N., Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth-Century Yorkshire, Yorkshire Archaeological Society, Record Series Author: Barrie Dobson.

The following is a list of monastic houses in North Yorkshire, England. Alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Knights Templars and Knights Hospitaller).The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the.

Cross, Claire and Noreen Vickers, Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth Century Yorkshire, (Leeds: Printed for the Society, ). Cross, Claire, ‘Yorkshire Nunneries in the Early Tudor Period’, in The religious orders in pre-Reformation England (Studies in the history of medieval religion, 18), ed.

Clark (Woodbridge, ), Get this from a library. Monks, friars and nuns in sixteenth century Yorkshire. [Claire Cross; Noreen Vickers; Yorkshire Archaeological Society.].

Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth Century Yorkshire, MRB1, p; A Project on the History of Mendicant Houses in London (c ‐ ), MRB2 p; The Role of the Friars in the Crusades and the Crusader States, MRB3, p; The. Claire Cross and Noreen Vickers’s book Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth-Century Yorkshire (Leeds, ), and Marilyn Oliva established some important markers for nuns in the diocese of Norwich in The Convent and the Community in Late Medieval England (Rochester, NY, ).

In “The Friars in the English Reformation,” an essay. The following is a list of monastic houses in West Yorkshire, England.

Alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Knights Templars and Knights Hospitaller).

Monastic hospitals are included were it had the status or function of an abbey, priory. Burton, J., The Monastic Order in Yorkshire in the late eleventh and twelfth centuries. Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth-Century Yorkshire.

Issue 2 () Medieval Cartularies of Great Britain: Amendments and Additions to the Davis Catalogue Issue 3 ().

Her other books include "The Puritan Earl: The Life of the Third Earl of Huntingdon" () and "The Royal Supremacy in the Elizabethan Church" () and she has edited "The Letters of Sir Francis Hastings" (), "York Clergy Wills " ( and ), with N.

Vickers, "Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth Century Yorkshire" () and. Monks, Friars and Nuns in Sixteenth-century Yorkshire, Yorkshire Archaeol Soc Rec SerLeeds Duff, E G A Century of the English Book Trade, Bibliographical Society, by: 2.

Nearly a thousand religious houses (abbeys, priories and friaries) were founded in England and Wales during the medieval period, accommodating monks, friars or nuns who had taken vows of obedience, poverty and chastity; each house was led by an abbot or abbess, or by a prior or their foundation monasteries and nunneries (although not friaries) had acquired endowments of land.

Cross and N. Vickers (eds.), Monks, friars and nuns in the sixteenth century, Yorkshire Archaeological and Historical Society Record Series vol. (Huddersfield, ) C.C. Webb (ed.), Churchwardens’ Accounts of St Michael, Spurriergate, York,2 vols, Borthwick Texts and Calendars 20 (York, ).

Web site for The Cistercians in Yorkshire project. Abbots. There are two primary sources which record details about the abbots of Fountains: the ‘Foundation history of Fountains’ (Narratio), compiled by Hugh of Kirkstall in the early thirteenth century and the fifteenth-century ‘President's Book’.The former details each abbacy from the foundation of Fountains until John of Kent (d.In the twelfth century, the power of laymen had been deliberately harnessed to the monastic ideal.

Great families still relied heavily for their hope of salvation on large benefactions to monastic communities engaged in permanent prayer and penitential exercise.

However, by the time religious houses were suppressed in England in the s, they no longer led society spiritually and : Andrew D. Brown.In Joan Greatrex wrote in her chapter on recent developments in monastic history that ‘in the last twenty years there has been an impressive increase of interest in the study of monastic history’.¹ The present volume is reassuring testimony that the developments so welcomed by Greatrex.